More consumers are choosing to buy from brands that share their values on sustainability, social responsibility and other issues. This mindset shift is also taking place at the office... Here’s why.

In a job interview, we can't help but feel nervous to make a good impression or insecure about being what the company is looking for. All job descriptions mention requirements in terms of academic and work experience or even soft skills, like being proactive or creative. 

Still, in recent years, all that has changed. Because of heightened awareness, companies engaged in social and environmental causes are being perceived as more appealing places to work. Here are some of these companies’ most prominent features: 

  • More flexibility and work-life balance: Their workdays are flexible, with start and finish times and remote working. Some companies even offer employees reduced working hours so they can look after their children. 
  • Other services as part of employees’ compensation: These include health and dental insurance and children’s daycare. 
  • Collaborative work environments: They avoid rigid corporate structures that turn the workplace into a silo and make communication one-way from supervisors to team members. 
  • Recruitment of people with physical and intellectual disabilities: They have plans to promote diversity and inclusion in their teams through employment programmes and career development. 
  • Aid for vulnerable people: This includes study grants for low-income university students. 
  • Support for social initiatives: This includes fundraisers to support the work of non-profit organizations.  
  • Eco-friendly policies: Endorsing the Paris Agreement was a major step for public and private entities in their commitment to fighting climate change

According to the “Randstad Employer Brand Research 2021” report, respondents in Europe cited an enjoyable and safe work environment (64% and 62% respectively) and an attractive salary (67%) as their top work requirements. Furthermore, Great Place to Work in Latin America says trust is a driver of progress in interprofessional relationships.  

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